Archive for the ‘Breast Feeding’ Category

Breastfeeding in Public: What’s a mom to do?

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

What kinds of images come to your mind when you think of breastfeeding in public? We often think primarily of the stories about moms who were breastfeeding in public and someone, usually a stranger, asked them to cover up. This can cause feelings of anxiety about how to breastfeed in public for moms who have not done it before.

First, let’s talk about what your rights are as a breastfeeding mom in Colorado, and how to be comfortable with breastfeeding outside of your home, free to feed your baby when he or she is hungry without worry of being embarrassed or harassed.

Colorado breastfeeding law 25-6-302 states quite clearly: “A mother may breastfeed in any place she has a right to be.”

Now you know that as long as you are allowed to be there, you can breastfeed! It’s pretty straightforward! The law protects and supports you as a breastfeeding mom.

Should you cover up while breastfeeding?

“Should” is a strong word. In short, if it helps you feel more comfortable to breastfeed in public, then, yes! If you or your baby struggle with covers or dislike them, then don’t bother! It is not your responsibility to make sure others around you are comfortable when your baby is eating.There are many, many different kinds of covers that you can buy or make yourself.

My favorite breastfeeding accessory was the nursing tank. I could un-snap from the top, pull baby in close, and latch him on without anyone noticing. My belly was completely covered. It was nice not having to lift up my shirt or pull my breast out above my shirt. This was the most discreet way that I found to do it. It gave me the confidence to breastfeed anywhere that I needed to, including the store, church, or at someone else’s house.

But what if someone confronts you while you’re breastfeeding?

Be reassured that most of the time, no one will even notice you are breastfeeding in public. It is rare that someone is asked to stop breastfeeding by a stranger. The media would show otherwise, but don’t pay attention to that! The stories you see on Facebook, etc, will give you undue fear and anxiety. Be confident that you can feed your baby and meet his or her basic needs in peace.

What should you do in the unlikely event that someone does say something to you? First and foremost, try to stay calm. You are representing breastfeeding moms everywhere and you have an opportunity to set a good example and be non-inflammatory. You could even role-play what you might say with your partner or a friend ahead of time.

State to the stranger that you are protected by law to freely breastfeed. Let them know that you are meeting your baby’s basic need and that you have every right to do so. Then look deeply into your sweet baby’s eyes and think about how much you love them and love being able to sustain them 100% from your own body! Amazing, right?

In summary, the best people to talk to about breastfeeding in public are the moms who have already done it successfully. Get ideas from them about how they do it. You might be surprised by what you hear. Most of them are probably going to tell you that they quickly learned how to feed the baby while out-and-about with little to no problems.  ❤️

EMAB and Doulaparty Team Up

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

 

 

Join the #doulaparty on Twitter or follow along at DesirreAndrews.com, June 22nd 6pm PT/9pm ET to kick off summer birth work with something extra special!

 

I am very excited that Earth Mama Angel Baby is sponsoring this weeks live chat. EMAB has amazing products for all types of birth professionals and families.

 

A note from the EMAB Team:

 

Are you a midwife, doula, nurse or obstetrician looking for pure, safe products to comfort postpartum mamas and brand new babies? You’ve come to the right place! Earth Mama Angel Baby offers safe alternatives for your clients who are concerned with detergents, parabens, 1,4-Dioxane, artificial fragrance, dyes, preservatives, emulsifiers and other toxins. Earth Mama products are used in hospitals, even on the most fragile NICU babies, and they all rate a zero on the Skin Deep toxin database, the best rating a product can receive. Earth Mama only uses the highest-quality, certified-organic or organically grown herbs and oils for our teas, bath herbs, gentle handmade soaps, salves, lotions and massage oils.

Earth Mama now offers a Birth Pro Cart for wholesale pricing available for birth support professionals! Join Earth Mama Angel Baby on the #doulaparty chat Friday June 22 to talk about their new shopping cart plus answer any questions you may have. Earth Mama will be giving away Postpartum Bath Herbs and Monthly Comfort Tea, Mama Bottom Balm, Mama Bottom Spray, and a grand prize of their new Travel Birth & Baby Kit!

Social Media and You

Sunday, October 16th, 2011

Get your pregnancy, birth or postpartum story heard!

I am looking to interview several mothers/families who have been positively changed, supported or impacted emotionally, physically, socially, educationally and/or spiritually during the perinatal (pregnancy, labor, childbirth, postpartum) and/or into the first year of mothering/processing birth outcomes through the use of/participation in social media outlets (Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Forums, Message Boards, etc.).

Purpose: Information will be used to complete a speaking session about birth and social media, as well as, material for additional writing, educational sharing opportunities.

If you are interested, please email me by October 31, 2011 with your contact information, when due if pregnant, how old your baby is if in the postpartum period and how you were affected by social media.

Contact: Desirre Andrews – Owner of Preparing For Birth LLC, birth professional, blogger, mentor, healthy birth advocate and social media enthusiast. Site: www.prepforbirth.com

Email: desirre@prepforbirth.com

Lactation Training Colorado Springs – Register now.

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

Transform your understanding about what breastfeeding/breastmilk really is:

• An irreplaceable relationship
• A brain developer

• An immune system
• An organ system
• A living tissue

Transform your professional skills

• Increase your doula competencies in the first hours after birth
• Hone your postpartum doula skills
• Learn unique strategies for teaching breastfeeding to families
• Explore adult learning styles
• Enhance your communication skills

Transform yourself

• Take the leap to explore new ways to work with families
• Connect with other women who love working with moms and babies
• Open your mind about new concepts surrounding breastfeeding
• Take the first step to becoming certified as a lactation
educator with CAPPA

Concepts covered over the three days include: Lactation Professionals, History
of Breastfeeding, Group Process, Learning Styles, Anatomy and Physiology of
Breastfeeding, The Importance of Breastmilk and Breastfeeding, Prenatal Support
and Breastfeeding issues, Birth’s Impact on Breastfeeding, the Hospital
Experience, Latch and the Breast Crawl, Skin To Skin, Signs of Successful
Feeding, Maternal and Infant Challenges, Medications and Breastmilk, Fathers and
Partners, and Curriculum Development.

LAST DAYS TO REGISTER!!!! Must register before 5pm, May 9th MST.

June 3-5, 2011, 8:30am-5:30pm, $425

Colorado Springs, CO at Prep for Birth

To register www.motherjourney.com

Ready to become more proficient when offering breastfeeding education? This
course is designed to improve the skill base, knowledge and perspectives on
breastfeeding and supporting both the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative and
Mother Friendly practices.

This course satisfies the following:

*The Core Competencies in Breastfeeding Care and Services for All Health
Professionals as outlined by the United States Breastfeeding Committee (no
endorsement by the USBC is implied).
http://www.usbreastfeeding.org/Portals/0/Publications/Core-Competencies-2010-rev.pdf

*The 20 Hour World Health Organization Curriculum to support the baby Friendly
Hospital Initiative.

http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/bfhi/en/index.html

*The CAPPA Lactation Educator certification step for workshop attendance.

http://www.cappa.net/get-certified.php?lactation-educator

Why become a certified lactation educator?

Certified Lactation Educators (CLEs) provide evidence based information to the
community, families and professionals to encourage an increase in breastfeeding
initiation, duration and support. CLEs are found teaching community and hospital
based breastfeeding classes, as peer breastfeeding counselors in hospital and
public health setting, facilitation support groups, running pump rental stations
and providing phone support.

The CAPPA CLE does not prescribe, treat, nor diagnose breastfeeding related
conditions and is trained to refer clients facing circumstances that require
this degree of intervention to a qualified professional. The CAPPA 20 Hour CLE
course is not an IBCLC exam prep course, nor does the CAPPA CLE training prepare
a student to become an IBCLC.

Your faculty:

Laurel Wilson, BS, IBCLC, CCCE, CLE, CLD, CPPFE, CPPI owns and manages
MotherJourney in Centennial, Colorado. She has her degree in Maternal and Child
Health-Lactation Consulting. With over sixteen years experience working with
women in the childbearing year, Laurel takes a creative approach to working with
the pregnant family. So is co-author of forthcoming book, The Greatest
Pregnancy Ever: The Keys to the MotherBaby Connection. Using journaling, birth
art, visualization and experiential exercises, women connect with their inner
resources to discover their true beliefs about themselves, their relationships,
and their abilities to birth and parent their children.

Laurel is certified as a lactation consultant/counselor and educator, childbirth
educator, labor doula, Prenatal Parenting Instructor, and Pre and Postpartum
fitness educator and prenatal yoga teacher. She serves as the CAPPA Executive
Director of Lactation Programs and trains Childbirth Educators and Lactation
Educators for CAPPA certification. Offering education and movement classes to
families in private and hospital settings, Laurel has created teaching
strategies that facilitate better understanding of the change processes during
the childbearing year. Laurel has been joyfully married to her husband for
almost 20 years and has two beautiful teenagers, whose difficult births led her
on a path towards helping emerging families create positive experiences. She
believes that the journey towards and into motherhood is a life changing rite of
passage that should be deeply honored and celebrated.

In light,
Laurel Wilson, BS, IBCLC, CLE, CCCE, CLD
Co-Author of forthcoming book, The Greatest Pregnancy Ever: The Keys to The
Mother-Baby Bond
MotherJourney Childbirth Services
CAPPA Executive Director and Faculty for Lactation Programs
Customer Advocate for InJoy Birth and Parenting
linfinitee@aol.com, www.motherjourney.com
720-291-9115

Connect with CAPPA:

Our website

On Facebook

The Best isn’t Better. Usual is where It is at.

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

There has been much ado surrounding the language of breastfeeding being normal and usual versus the best for baby and mother in great thanks to Diane Weissinger. It is so valuable to recognize that while we all desire to be the best, we often hit the normal everyday averages in life. We are comfortable reaching a goal that seems more attainable. Best or better can feel so far out of reach where average and usual seem quite in reach most of the time. None of us generally want to be below the average or usual. Thus the language of the risks of NOT breastfeeding is so vital.

I would like to see the same type of language revolving around pregnancy and birth as well.

In the overall picture here is the usual occurrence: Ovulation leads to heightened sexual desire, which leads to sexual activity, which leads to pregnancy, which leads to labor, which leads to birth, which leads to breastfeeding…..

So how do we look at language as an important part of our social fabric and belief systems surrounding this process?

Let us look at contrasting statements of what is often heard and how a positive point of view can be adapted.

Pregnancy is: a burden, an illness, an affliction, a mistake, something to be tolerated……

Pregnancy is: a gift, wonderful, amazing, part of the design, someone to grow…..

Labor is: scary, worth fearing, the unknown, unpredictable, painful, to be avoided, to be numbed from, to be medicated, to be induced, out of control, unfeminine…..

Labor is: what happens at the end of pregnancy, hard work but worth it, manageable by our own endorphins and oxytocin, an adventure, not bigger than the woman creating it, to be worked with, worth be present for, is what baby expects……..

Pushing and Birth are: terrifying, physically too difficult, only works for women who are not too small, short, skinny, big, fat, young or old, responsible for pelvic floor problems, out of control, horrible……..

Pushing and Birth are: what happens after dilation completes, to help baby prepare for breathing, bonding and feeding, sometimes pleasurable, sometimes fast, sometimes slow, able to occur in water, standing, laying down, squatting, on hands and knees, often most effective when a woman is given the opportunity to spontaneously work with her baby and body, not always responsible for pelvic floor issues, amazing, hard work, worthwhile, sets the finals hormonal shifts in motion for mother and baby……

Is it really BETTER? I say no. It is usual and normal.

  • Spontaneous labor is not better – it is the expected usual occurrence at the end of pregnancy.
  • Unmedicated labor and birth is not better – it is what the body mechanisms and baby expect to perform at normal levels.
  • Unrestricted access to movement, support and safety in response to labor progression is not better – it is the usual expectation to facilitate a normal process.
  • Spontaneous physiologic pushing is not better – it is what a woman will just do, in her way.
  • Spontaneous birth is not better – it is what a mother and baby do.
  • Keeping mother and baby together without separation is not better – it is what both the mother and baby are expecting to facilitate bonding, breastfeeding, and normal newborn health.

Denying the norms and adding in unnecessary interventions, medications and separation is creating a risky environment for mothers and babies. Thus increasing fear, worry,and even a desire to be fixed at all costs.

Perhaps even worse, an atmosphere has been created where the abnormal has become the expected norm and the normal has become the problem to be eradicated.

Bottom line, our language matters and will help shape for the positive or negative the future of birth.

What is a labor doula? What does she (or he) do?

Sunday, August 9th, 2009

Women have supported women throughout the ages.  In our very busy and ever transient culture, the woman to woman education and support of yesteryear is sorely lacking.  It is very common for an expecting woman not have family nearby or to have support women who know the ways of natural, normal pregnancy, labor, delivery and immediate postpartum. The labor doula was born out of this need.  Essentially this is a woman of knowledge and skill in pregnancy, birth, and immediate postpartum (yes there are a few men in who are labor doulas as well) who comes alongside a pregnant woman (family) offering education, physical support and emotional support to both the mother and partner/husband/other support.

Below is a detailed description of what a doula is and does according to CAPPA a wonderful organization that trains a variety of doulas and other birth professionals.

What is a Labor Doula?

A doula is a person who attends the birthing family before, during, and just after the birth of the baby. The certified doula is trained to deliver emotional support from home to hospital, ease the transition into the hospital environment, and be there through changing hospital shifts and alternating provider schedules. The doula serves as an advocate, labor coach, and information source to give the mother and her partner the added comfort of additional support throughout the entire labor. There are a variety of titles used by women offering these kinds of services such as “birth assistant,” “labor support specialist” and “doula”.

What Does a Doula Do?

The following is a general description of what you might expect from a CAPPA certified labor doula. Typically, doulas meet with the parents in the second or third trimester of the pregnancy to get acquainted and to learn about prior birth experiences and the history of this pregnancy. She may help you develop a birth plan, teach relaxation, visualization, and breathing skills useful for labor. Most importantly, the doula will provide comfort, support, and information about birth options.

A doula can help the woman to determine prelabor from true labor and early labor from active labor. At a point determined by the woman in labor, the doula will come to her and assist her by:

  • Helping her to rest and relax
  • Providing support for the woman’s partner
  • Encouraging nutrition and fluids in early labor
  • Assisting her in using a variety of helpful positions and comfort measures
  • Constantly focus on the comfort of both the woman and her partner
  • Helping the environment to be one in which the woman feels secure and confident
  • Providing her with information on birth options

A doula works cooperatively with the health care team. In the event of a complication, a doula can be a great help in understanding what is happening and what options the family may have. The doula may also help with the initial breastfeeding and in preserving the privacy of the new family during the first hour after birth.

What does a doula cost? This can be a huge spectrum and is defined by where you live.  A labor doula may volunteer, work for barter, or basics like gas reimbursement, childcare coverage, snacks, etc.  I have heard of fees from $100 to $1800 (mind you this is in NYC).  On average I would say a labor doula costs $250-$600 in many areas.   Call around or visit websites in your area to get a firm idea.

What about insurance? Private doulas usually do not bill insurance though many will give a super bill to be submitted for reimbursement by insurance.  many insurance companies after some effort will pay a portion of the fee as an out of network provider.

Will a doula provide my complete childbirth education? Sometimes.  Often not.  Some doulas are educators. I provide classes separately from doula services. The labor doula will often fill in the blanks and personalize the education the client already has.  Many doulas have lending libraries or recommended reading and watching lists.

If I am going to a birth center or having a homebirth will a doula still benefit me? Yes in both cases.  When going to a birth center a doula would labor at home then arrive at the birth center at the same time as the laboring mother just as with a hospital birth.  In a homebirth scenario the doula who is not a midwife and does no medical tasks is often a welcome extra set of hands and does the same emotional and physical support as she would do in any other location.

Does evidence support that having a doula in attendance has benefits? YES. Here are some of the benefits. Lowered epidural, narcotic, induction, cesarean, and instrumental delivery rates. Increased satisfaction, breastfeeding, and bonding.  Also shorter labors!

For more information, email me at desirre@prepforbirth.com.

Applied Skills for Childbirth and Postpartum Professionals

Saturday, August 8th, 2009

Applied Skills for Childbirth and Postpartum Professionals

A continuing education seminar featuring sessions taught by CAPPA Faculty Trainers, designed to benefit Doulas and Educators alike.

August 22, 2009 ~ 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. ~ Swedish Medical Center.

. Amanda Glenn MA, CPD – Navigating the NICU Experience

. Desirre Andrews CCCE, LCCE, CLD, CLE – Interpreting the Research

. Ana M. Hill, CLD, CLE, CCCE – Support for Sexual Trauma Survivors

. Laurel Wilson BS, CLC, CLE, CCCE, CLD – Today’s Breastfeeding Technology & Tools

Contact hours: 6 CAPPA CEs, 7.2 ICEA CEs.

Registration through August 14th is $65.

Walk-in Registration is $75.

Optional Networking Breakfast 8 – 9 a.m., $8. (No walk-ins)

Optional Dinner and “Pregnant in America” screening 5-6 p.m., $10. (No
walk-ins)

Space is limited. To ensure your space, please register right away!

Registration at
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=903MJPLO66V_2fg2EpFXs3_2bw_3d_3d

For more information, email amanda@houseofdoula.com.