Archive for the ‘cesarean delivery’ Category

An unexpected breech cesarean – A mother’s perspective

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

A guest post on an unexpected breech cesarean from a mother’s perspective. From the heart. Where reality meets birth.

 

My husband and I got married roughly four years ago and wanted a baby. Our plans to conceive a baby was derailed, as I lost my job shortly after we got married. We finally began trying in 2009 and 18 months later we found out that we were expecting. I was excited to finally be pregnant. The doctor confirmed my pregnancy and we got to see our baby for the first time on October 25th, 2010. I had a dream a few nights before our sonogram that we were expecting a baby boy. During my sonogram on December 29th, we found out that we were expecting a baby boy.

 

False Labor Runs

Everything was going smoothly with the pregnancy, despite a few false labor runs. I began having false labor around 35 weeks. My contractions were coming every 5-7 minutes consistently; however, they weren’t changing my cervix. After 2 false labor runs during the middle of the night, my baby decided to wait until his due date to be delivered. A few days before my due date, things took a turn and my birthing plans were tossed out the window.

My doctor ordered an ultrasound on May 24th, the day my baby was due to check on the fluid levels since my fluid levels began dropping off after I reached my due date in a previous pregnancy. The ultrasound tech was checking the fluid levels and they were within the normal ranged. However, she discovered that my baby was now breech. He decided to turn breech over the weekend. All throughout my pregnancy, he was head down. In fact, on the previous Friday when my doctor checked me, he was head down during my exam.

My Dream Birth Was Thrown Out the Window

When the ultrasound technician found his head up in my ribs, I immediately knew that I was going to have to deliver him via c-section. I was devastated that I wasn’t going to have the labor and delivery that I had been planning in my head for months. I wanted to have a natural birth with minimal interventions. My dream labor included: freedom to get up and move around, walk the halls to help progress labor, labor in the bathtub, and less fetal monitoring. These dreams faded away quickly as my doctor scheduled my c-section.

Manual Inversion Was Too Risky

My doctor offered to attempt to manually turn the baby. If she could get him turned manually then she would proceed with inducing labor. However, she explained the risks to me and told me that I had an anterior placenta. She said the risks included: placental detachment, placental tears, and bleeding. These risks scared me to death and I felt that it was best to proceed with a C-Section.

I was so miserable and uncomfortable that I went ahead and had a c-section, but if I had the knowledge that I know now and had the money to hire a doula, I would have paid for one. A doula is a trained and experienced birth coach. They are trained to help support a mother emotionally, physically, and provide information about the choices they have to make in regards to their care. After speaking to a wonderful doula on twitter, I personally feel that I might not have been so quick to agree to a c-section. Desirre told me that there are ways to try and get the baby to turn on its own or even attempt to deliver him breech, since I had previously had successful births. But I didn’t know that when I had to make a decision about my C-Section.

Doulas Can Help Mom’s Who Have C-Sections

Doulas can even be hired for C-section births. They usually don’t participate in the actual surgery but they can provide support during the preparation and during postpartum care. A C-Section wasn’t as bad as I thought it was going to be. The hardest part was the uncontrollable shaking that I experienced as the anesthesia from my spinal block was wearing off. I felt that the spinal anesthesia kept me from enjoying those first moments of breastfeeding my baby.

 

Christy is a wife to her loving husband of 4 years and a mother to three beautiful children – Ages 15, 11, and 15 months old. I am the owner and founder of Uplifting Families. In my spare time, I enjoy blogging, spending time with my family, going to church, and playing games. I can be found on twitter at @upliftingfam

A Cesarean Plan

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

Cesarean is often the last thing we want to think about during pregnancy. Most of us think it will not happen to us. Having a plan, an idea of what to ask for, to know there are ways to bridge the gap between Plan A and Plan C can be very beneficial to both mother and baby.

There is no way to make a cesarean just like a healthy vaginal birth, and frankly, that ought not be the goal. It can be however a much more family centered, family bonded, more respectful and humane experience.

Speak to your provider ahead of time about needs and desires. If you know you are having a cesarean ahead of time, meeting with the Nurse Manager and the anesthesiology department can be useful in obtaining what you want. Have the conversations, create partnerships.

Below is my latest version of a family centered cesarean plan  that can be used for a planned or unplanned cesarean delivery. All requests may not be feasible in all areas, but even small changes can be helpful.

It may be copied and pasted into your own document for personalization, however I do ask that you credit the source if you are an educator, doula or related professional using it as a sample.

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Name: Jane Doe

Estimated Due Date: January 1, 20XX

Care Provider: XXXXXX

We are seeking to make a cesarean delivery as special, low stress and family centered as possible.In the event a true emergency and general anesthesia is needed, I understand that some of my requests cannot be honored.

JUST PRIOR TO/DURING DELIVERY / RECOVERY –

  • I would like to meet each staff member in the OR by name who will be participating in the cesarean.
  • I may ask my _________ for aromatherapy to help with nausea, surgical smells and stress.
  • I ask that only essential conversation be allowed.
  • I would like to play ______ music in the OR if it won’t be a distraction to those performing surgery.
  • I would like my ______________ to take photos and/or video of the birth of my baby.  I respect that the surgeon and anesthesiologist may not want the entire surgery on video, however I would like a record of my baby being born to make it as special and personal as possible.
  • Explain all medications that will be used to me. I prefer a bolus and oral medications versus a PCA afterward.
  • Please lower the drape so I may view my baby coming out of me and hold my baby up so I can see him/her at the moment of birth.
  • Request my arms not be strapped down so I may touch my baby freely.
  • I would like my baby to remain connected to the placenta after manual extraction, as the cord will continue to pulsate for some time. I would like my ___________ to cut the cord after 10 minutes post delivery or the cord has stopped pulsating near the umbilicus.
  • I would like my baby placed skin to skin on my chest immediately with basic assessments being done while on me. My husband (partner/family member can hold baby there with a warm blanket over my baby and help maintain the sterile field.
  • I would like to breastfeed in the OR or as soon as possible in recovery.
  • I would like for my ________________ and baby to stay in the OR with me while surgery is completed and remain in recovery with me.
  • If the baby needs medical assistance requiring leaving the OR, I’d like for another person (doula, friend or family member) to attend me in the OR while my ___________________ goes with the baby, so my baby nor I will have to be alone.
  • In the event baby needs to leave the OR, I would like the wipe down towel(s) to be placed against my chest skin and baby to be pressed on me for fluid and odor transfer.
  • Asking for a delay in eye ointment and Vitamin K until after the first hour of bonding time or I am waiving all immunizations and eye ointment.
  • In the event of a hysterectomy, please do not remove my ovaries or anything else that is not medically necessary

REGARDING BABY

  • In the event the baby requires medical attention beyond that of a healthy baby, please inform me (husband/partner/family member) verbally what is needed or will be needed so I can actively participate in choices made for my baby’s care.
  • In the event of  a need for separation of my baby from me:
    • Limit the number of persons who touch or attend my baby to only those on staff as needed and my _____________.
    • Request my baby not be bathed or fully dressed until I have the opportunity to smell, touch, cuddle, etc. with my baby and I am able to participate in the bathing.
    • I plan to breastfeed exclusively, so no pacifier, formula, sugar water should be given to my baby.
  • No tests shall be performed or medications administered, etc. without my ________________ consent & prior knowledge

Thank you for honoring my requests for me and my baby.

Preparing For Birth, LLC

All Rights Reserved 2011

Family Centered Cesarean Plan

Saturday, October 16th, 2010

Below is my version of a family centered cesarean plan – can be used for a planned or unplanned cesarean delivery.

Sample Cesarean Plan PDF

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We are trying to make a cesarean delivery as special and intimate as possible for us even though we did not have the desired vaginal birth.

DURING DELIVERY / RECOVERYIn the event a general anesthesia needs to be performed, I understand that some of my requests cannot be honored.

  • I would like to meet each staff member in the OR who will be participating in the cesarean.
  • I may use aromatherapy to help with nausea, surgical smells and stress.
  • I would like to play ______ music in the OR if it won’t be a distraction to those performing surgery.
  • Explain all medications that will be used to me. I prefer a bolus and oral medications versus a PCA afterward.
  • I would like for my husband (partner/family member) and baby to stay in the OR with me while surgery is completed and remain in recovery with me.
  • If the baby needs medical assistance requiring leaving the OR I’d like for another person (doula, friend or family member) to attend me in the OR while my husband (partner/family member) goes with the baby so I won’t have to be alone.
  • I would like to take photos and video of the birth of my baby.  I respect that the surgeon and anesthesiologist may not want the entire surgery on video, however I would like a record of my baby being born to make it as special and personal as possible.
  • Please lower the curtain and hold my baby up so I can see him/her at the moment of birth.
  • Request my arms not be strapped down so I may touch my baby freely.
  • I would like my baby to remain connected to the placenta after manual extraction, as the cord will continue to pulsate for some time. I would like my ___________ to cut the cord after 10 minutes post delivery or the cord has stopped pulsating near the umbilicus.
  • I would like my baby placed skin to skin on my chest immediately after basic assessments while in the OR. My husband (partner/family member can hold baby there with a warm blanket over my baby.
  • In the event of a hysterectomy, please do not remove my ovaries or anything else that isn’t medically necessary.
  • I would like to breastfeed my baby as soon as possible in recovery.

REGARDING BABY

  • In the event the baby requires medical attention beyond that of a healthy baby, please inform me (husband/partner/family member) verbally what is needed or will be needed so I can actively participate in choices made for my baby’s care.
  • Limit the number of persons who touch or attend my baby to only those on staff as needed and my husband (partner/family member).
  • Request my baby not be bathed or fully dressed until I have the opportunity to smell, touch, cuddle, etc. with my baby and I am able to participate in the bathing.
  • Delaying immunizations, even eye ointment and vitamin K.
  • I plan to breastfeed exclusively, so no pacifier, formula, sugar water should be given to my baby.
  • No tests shall be performed or medications administered, etc. without my (husband/partner/family member) consent & prior knowledge

Thank you for honoring my requests for me and my baby.

Tell NBC What YOU Think – ICAN meets mother-sized activisim

Sunday, February 7th, 2010

http://blog.ican-online.org/2010/02/07/mother-sized-activism-nbc/

The International Cesarean Awareness Network wants you to get involved and speak your mind about what you think of the NBC “Live in the OR” piece from last week. Here is the link to ICAN’s official response.

The only way that mass media will be responsible for what they put on the airwaves is for real people, the  consumers to speak their minds.  Please click on the above think and go for it. Be heard. It does make a difference.

“Elective” Cesarean – If you had one…..

Friday, February 5th, 2010

There is much in the news and in community talk how women are signing up for cesareans electively. I am very intrigued by this assumption and believe there is much misinformation regarding the topic out in the public for consumption. I am seeking to shed some more light on this topic.

Though this is not a scientific survey, I believe your experiences can help others in understanding why women are making this choice, as well as, potentially aiding other women in informed decision making.

If you have had or are planning an “elective” cesarean, I appreciate you answering this informal survey.  Answers can be submitted via confidential email to desirre@prepforbirth.com. By responding you are agreeing to allow me to use the information anonymously in a future blog, writing or other educational medium.

  1. Was your “elective cesarean for a medical reason?  If so, what?
  2. Was your “elective” cesarean for a non-medical reason?  If so, what?
  3. How were you given informed consent?
  4. What information were you given in the cesarean consent for benefits, risks, consequences, and alternative for you and your baby?
  5. Were any words such as: Easier, safer, painless, no big deal, not risky, saves vagina or less pain used to describe potential experience?
  6. Were you told your cesarean was necessary and found out later it was coded as elective?
  7. Did you ever feel pressured or led by care provider to choose cesarean?
  8. After your cesarean, did you feel you were consented fully enough prior to the surgery?
  9. Did the cesarean “do” or live up to what you were told for you and your baby?  How so?  How not?
  10. Would you make the same choice again or would you “go for” a VBAC?
  11. What country do you reside?

Thank you very much for answering these questions. I am so grateful for input on this subject.

If you would like any information shared and attributed to you as a quote,  please indicate in your email to me.  As stated above, otherwise your identity will be kept completely anonymous and confidential.

Rethinking the nature of intervention in childbirth

Saturday, January 16th, 2010

There is much awareness and conversation of what the routine interventions are that can occur during the labor and birth process within the hospital environment.  These interventions can include induction, augmentation with Pitocin, epidural, or cesarean. In all my professional and personal roles, I am privy to a great amount of pregnancy and birth stories. Within these experiences there are many “silent” yet obvious interventions that are hidden in plain sight under the guise of protocol, practice and societal expectation.

My current list of hidden in plain sight interventions in no particular order that can make a difference on how a woman labors and ultimately delivers her baby is below.

  • The uniform -Asking and expecting the mother to give up her clothes for the hospital gown.
  • Who’s on first? – If care provider is part of a large practice or on-call group a woman may have never met or have any knowledge of the person who’s practice style and philosophy is helping to guide and steer her labor and delivery. On-call CP may or may not adhere to the birth plan the laboring woman worked out with her own CP.
  • On a short leash – Continuous monitoring even if she is not high risk, medicated, or being induced/augmented.
  • The big drag around – Requiring IV running with absence of medical need.
  • Staying put – Asking or requiring the laboring woman to stay in bed for ease of staff without medical need.
  • Ice chips and Jello – Disallowing snacks and sometimes even actual water even though labor is hard work.
  • The marketing tool – Disallowing the laboring woman to get into the touted tubs or showers since it isn’t convenient for staff and she will not want to get out.
  • One is enough – Limiting the amount or type of support persons a woman is allowed to have with her.
  • I know more than you – Treating the laboring woman as if she knows nothing or shouldn’t know anything.
  • If you don’t… – Instead of giving informed consent and refusal, telling only what bad could, maybe happen.
  • Attitude and atmosphere – Negative, non-listening, lacking compassion, leaving the door open, ignoring requests, and the like when a woman is laboring.
  • Only if you ask – Though some wonderful practices are in place, they are only offered if a laboring woman or postpartum mother ask/insist on it.
  • Bait and switch – The official tour of labor and delivery and the reality of labor and delivery don’t fit together.
  • New with bells and whistles – The pretty with all the fancy bells and whistles like wi-fi, flat screen tv’s, etc. have to be paid for somehow. Because of this investigate the intervention rates there.
  • Routine vaginal exams – By and large VE’s are very subjective and can vary greatly between one person to the next on how they score a VE. This variation can deeply affect the course of a woman’s labor and delivery.  Women birthing in the hospital really only “need” a VE upon entrance for assessment of where she is in labor, if she desires an epidural/IV narcotics, if she is having a very prolonged labor, or if she feels pushy.
  • Pushing the epidural – When a woman is moving, moaning, making noise or just doing her thing in labor and it causes the staff discomfort or worry.  It could even be that anesthesiologist is going in to surgery and it can only happen now.

Simply because a societal norm is birthing at the hospital, as well as, what routinely goes on there, doesn’t mean the hidden in plain sight interventions are wise or harmless.

My goal here is to give pause and broader thinking to what intervention means for labor and delivery as another tool in planning and preparing for childbirth with eyes wide open.

Sisterhood of the Scar Revisited

Sunday, January 3rd, 2010

Many years ago I wrote this piece after attending my very first ICAN conference in San Diego in 2005. I read this and part of me weeps for her, for the me I was and for the women who are becoming part of this sisterhood willingly, wittingly or not.  My pain has been transformed into outstretched hands and heart. It has given me a sensitivity and awareness of the birth world I would probably have never achieved on my own had my births been perfect, idyllic and without this trauma.

I love you dear sisters and my life would be far less without each of you.

Seems a long distance the ivory tower to the ground.  The surprise in finding the thorny bushes with burrs that dig deep and puncture again at will? Well meaning onlookers say “Well a hundred years ago you both would have died?”  And the farce begins.  Stuff it down because it is crazy not to be grateful for the surgeon’s hand.  Smile and pretend all the twisted darkness inside doesn’t really exist.  The oft daily chore mixed with joy of caring for a baby whom we are unsure is truly our own.   The continuing assault during lovemaking when a cringe comes from the depths when a loving and hungry hand brushes the incision site.  “How can he think I am beautiful?  How can he possibly want this?”  Another thing of beauty and perfection quashed underneath the burden of the surgeon’s handprint.  Oh no say it hasn’t already been a year.  The birthday.  THE birthday sounds so exciting but terror strikes.  Preparation to be happy, preparation to feel joy.  Preparation not to shortchange our amazing gift of a child under the pain of the surgeon’s knife print.

The anticipated day meant to birth us into motherhood and my child into my waiting hands to my craving breasts, I was birthed into the Sisterhood of the Scar forever.

Shocking quotes regarding maternal choice to VBAC birth

Friday, October 16th, 2009

Joy Szabo has been in the news lately for desiring a second VBAC for her fourth baby (vaginal birth, emergency cesarean, and vaginal birth).  She has been denied locally in her area of Page, AZ to have a vaginal birth. Due to this situation, the International Cesarean Awareness Network has been assisting her in fighting the VBAC ban along with seeking out additional options.

After reading the latest article regarding Ms. Szabo, I am completely dumbfounded by the remarks made by other readers of her story.  I am stunned by how it seems the general populous regards a woman’s autonomy and medical rights.  I am also including positive comments as counterpoint. Where do you fall?  What do you believe? Many of these comments point me in the direction of what is so wrong with the system.  That of physician and hospital trumping patient.

You decide is the comment pro or con?

“…..it seems like many people do not grasp malpractice and insurance companies. This is not about the hospital, but about medical professionals and hospitals not wanting litigation. Can you blame them? After spending tens of thousands of dollars on an education before making a dime, I would do what I needed to to avoid a lawsuit, too! … we go to doctors because they DO know what is best for our health! Like another poster said, in health care, the customer is NOT always right.”

“My son was born by c-section, then my daughter vaginally, with no adverse affects. While I agree it’s the doctor’s decision to take the risk or not, it seems over-the-top conservative. Does the doctor’s insurance premium go up if this procedure is performed? Then charge more and give the patient the option.”

“C-sections are done in the US more routinely than in any other developed country but our infant mortality rate is not lower but higher. Doctors do not want to deliver on weekends, at night, if the mother is one week over her electronically determined due date. Yes complications can happen, more so if you are made to stay in a bed hooked up to monitors, a monitor screwed in to the baby’s head, your water broke prematurely, inducement before the baby or mother are physically ready to give birth. All of this leads to more injuries and deaths than needed. Doctors look upon birth as an illness, not the process that it is – an inexact human birth. I am not suggesting giving birth in a field alone, but a c-section has a greater risk than the V-Bac especially if she has had one already. C-sections for true emergencies yes, otherwise no.”

“Did anyone else notice that when they list the risks of a C-section, they failed to mention that the mother is 4-7 times more likely to DIE than with a vaginal birth.?!?!?! They also fail to mention all the potential complications to her health, the roughly 30% rate of problems following the surgery (some severe enough to require rehospitalization) and the challenges associated with caring for children while recovering from major abdominal surgery.  Good for this mom and I hope more mothers will take courage from her”

“This story is exaggeration. If the woman wants a vbac, she just has to show up at that hospital in labor and refuse a section. They can’t force her to have a c-section no matter what they would prefer she do. You can’t force a woman to have a c-section under any circumstances, so as long as the docs and nurses say she and the baby are tolerating labor, she has no reason to fear being forced into an operation.”

“I worked in the hospital for 5 years and then in a birth center for the last 4 years. I had to get out of the hospital because I started feeling guilty about my complicity in that system in which so much goes on behind closed doors of which the patient is never informed. I’ve had docs tell me in the lunch room that they are doing a c-section because they have an important golf game, fishing trip, or hot date. Then they go into the room, lie to the woman and say, ” oh your baby is too big, your progress is too slow, it’s never going to happen.” the woman believes them and thanks them so much for saving their babies lives. Over and over and over again. In Miami we have over 50% c-section rate, and it’s way more convenient for the docs. If VBACS are not allowed at more and more hospitals, the rest of the country will soon be like it is here…..”

“I find this decision by the hospital(s) to not do a VBAC as a little crazy. My older brother was born (in 1955) by C-section; both me (in 1958) and my younger brother (in 1962) were born vaginally. NO COMPLICATIONS. It could be done 50 years ago, but not now??”

“The risk of MAJOR complication from a second cesarean is TEN TIMES that of the risk of uterine rupture in a VBAC mother. Someone please explain to me how an “elective” repeat cesarean is safer than a VBAC? Especially since more than 75% of uterine ruptures occur PRIOR to the onset of labor. How is a scheduled cesarean at 39 weeks (which is the ACOG recommendation) going to save the mother who ruptures at the dinner table at 34 weeks? Using their logic, we should all go live at the hospital the moment we become pregnant after a previous cesarean, just in case our uterus blows up and we need an OB and an anesthesiologist “immediately available”.”

So what do you think?  It worries me that is seems the mother’s rights do not count for much. That in some of the comments the idea of  forcing a cesarean is no big deal if it makes the doctor’s position safer.

I think that most people are woefully under educated on childbirth and what safety really means.  A conservative physician errs on the side of evidence not defensive practice.  Do your own research. Be your own advocate.

How real is active phase arrest of labor?

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

Preparing For Birth – Common Pregnancy and Childbirth Terms

Tuesday, August 25th, 2009

Below is a compilation of common terms and acronyms that women often will come across during pregnancy, labor, and delivery.  Check back as more will be added from time to time.

  • AROM – Artificial Rupture of Membranes – using a finger or tool to open the amniotic sac to to allow the fluid to release.
  • PROM – Premature Rupture of Membranes – when the amniotic fluids releases before labor starts.
  • SROM – Spontaneous Rupture of Membranes during labor.
  • ROM – Rupture of Membranes
  • Miso – Misoprostol is the pharmacological name for Cytotec a drug used for cervical ripening and induction though a controversial, off and against label used ulcer Medication
  • VBAC – Vaginal Birth After Cesarean
  • HBAC – Home Birth After Cesarean
  • WBAC – Water Birth After Cesarean
  • UBAC – Unattended Birth After Cesarean
  • CBAC – Cesarean Birth After Cesarean – This is a repeat cesarean after a woman desires and tries to have a vaginal birth after cesarean.
  • ERCS – Elective Repeat Cesarean
  • RCS – Repeat Cesarean
  • Natural Birth – Labor and vaginal delivery free from intervention except for intermittent fetal monitoring. In the hospital only a saline lock and intermittent monitoring.
  • Vaginal Birth – Baby born vaginally with or without medication and intervention.
  • First Stage – Early, Active, and Transition. This encompasses the effacement to 100%, dilation to 10 centimeters/complete, position movement of cervix from posterior to forward as contractions begin while staying longer, strong and closer together prior to pushing and delivery.
  • Second Stage – Pushing phase after cervix is completely dilated to delivery of baby.
  • Third Stage – Delivery of baby to delivery of placenta.
  • Fourth Stage – First hours after placenta is delivered.
  • Oxytocin – A hormone made in the brain that plays a role in childbirth and lactation by causing muscles to contract in the uterus (womb) and the mammary glands in the breast. It also plays a role in bonding with mate, child, and socially.
  • Pitocin (oxytocin injection, USP) is a sterile, clear, colorless aqueous solution of synthetic oxytocin, for intravenous infusion or intramuscular injection.
  • Prostaglandin – Any of a group of hormone like fatty acids found throughout the body, esp. in semen, that affect blood pressure, metabolism, body temperature, and other important body processes such as cervical ripening.
  • Uterus -The muscular organ in which a fertilized egg implants and matures through pregnancy. During menstruation, the uterus sheds the inner lining.
  • Cervix -The lower portion of the uterus that provides an opening between the uterus and the vagina. Also known as the neck of the uterus that softens, effaces, dilates and changes position during labor.
  • Vagina – A muscular canal between the uterus and the outside of the body. Also known as the birth canal.
  • Perineum – The area between the anus and the vulva (the labial opening to the vagina).
  • Pelvis -The basin like cavity formed by the ring of bones of the pelvic girdle in the posterior part of the trunk in many vertebrates: in humans, it is formed by the ilium, ischium, pubis, coccyx, and sacrum, supporting the spinal column and resting upon the legs.
  • Pelvic Floor Muscles -The sphincter mechanism of the lower urinary tract, the upper and lower vaginal supports, and the internal and external anal sphincters. It is a network of muscles, ligaments, and other tissues that hold up the pelvic organs.  Includes bladder, rectum, vagina and uterus.
  • Fundus –  Top of the uterus. During labor contractions the fundus thickens and gets more firm as the strength of contractions increase and dilation increases.
  • Placenta -The organ that develops during pregnancy that transports nutrients to the fetus and waste away from the fetus. The placenta is attached to the uterus and is connected to the fetus by the umbilical cord.
  • Umbilical cord – The cord that transports blood, oxygen and nutrients to the baby from the placenta.
  • Bloody Show – Mucous and blood mixed together as dilation and effacement occurs.  Starts off as blood tinged mucous and becomes heavier as labor progresses.
  • Stripping membranes –  Pressing the amniotic sac away from the inside of the cervix.
  • Mucous plug – The mucous that blocks off the non-dilated and non-ripened cervix for protection.
  • Lochia – Post birth bleeding that though a wound site from the placenta detaching from the uterine wall, it mimics a heavy and long menstrual period.
  • Cesarean – Baby born via a surgical incision made through the abdomen into the uterus.
  • Obstetrician – Is the surgical specialty dealing with the care of women and their children during pregnancy, childbirth and the immediate post birth time.
  • Midwife – Is a person usually a woman who is trained to assist women during pregnancy,  during childbirth, and postpartum as well as the newborn post birth.  There are many types of midwives – some work in the home, at birth centers or in the hospital.
  • Doula – Is an assistant who provides various forms of non-medical and non-midwifery support (physical and emotional) in the childbirth process. Based on a particular doula’s training and background, the doula may offer support during prenatal care, during childbirth and/or during the postpartum period. A birth doula provides support during labor. A labor doula may attend a home birth or might attend the laboring at home and continue while in transport and then complete supporting the birth at a hospital or a birth center. A postpartum doula typically begins providing care in the home after the birth. Such care might include cooking for the mother, breastfeeding support, newborn care assistance, errands, light housekeeping, etc. Such care is provided from the day after the birth, providing services through the first six weeks postpartum. In some cases, doula care can last several months or even to a year postpartum – especially in cases when mothers are suffering from postpartum depression, children with special needs require longer care, or there are multiple infants.
  • Birth Center – Free standing location usually run by one or more certified nurse midwife. True birth centers are almost always independently run. They are not overseen by a hospital or in a hospital. May be near a hospital. Often set-up like a home birth space and epidurals or other pain medications are not available.   Hospital “birth centers” are labor and delivery floors not birth centers in the true sense of the term.
  • Intervention – Anything that does not exist in a naturally occuring labor and delivery that is done.
  • Saline Lock/Buffalo Cap/ Hep Lock – Is the apparatus that the IV line hooks into.  It is silicone tubing that is lightweight with a plastic needle that stays under the skin to allow easy vein access.
  • Foley – A foley catheter is used to release the bladder if a woman unable to urinate due to an epidural, post surgery, or with a swollen urethra post birth.  It can also be used for successful cervical ripening in lieu of cytotec.
  • Induction – To attempt to artificially start labor usually by pitocin, artificial rupture of membranes with or without cervical ripening (Cytotec or Foley Catheter).
  • Epidural – A medical method of giving pain relief during labor. A catheter is inserted through the lower back into a space near the spinal cord. Anesthesia is given through this catheter, and results in decreased sensation from the abdomen to the feet.
  • Contraction – Tightening and loosening of your uterus. Productive contractions are often felt at the bottom of the uterus, start out like period cramps and progressively grow stronger, longer in length, and closer together.
  • Braxton-Hicks – Practice contractions that do not dilate or efface the cervix often felt at the top of the uterus versus the bottom.
  • Episiotomy – A surgical procedure to widen the outlet of the birth canal to facilitate delivery of the baby and avoid a jagged rip of the perineum. (Natural abrading or tearing is preferred and episiotomies are not evidence-based to be used except under specific circumstances).
  • Ina May’s Sphincter Law -Tapping into the concept that if one sphincter is open and relaxed, the others will also open, relax and be able to handle, quite adequately, the task at hand. This also includes the aspect of birth requiring privacy, sacredness, and honor as well so a woman feels safe, unwatched and supported.
  • Kegel Exercises – Named after Dr. Arnold Kegel, consists of contracting and relaxing the muscles that form part of the pelvic floor (sometimes called the “Kegel muscles”).