Archive for the ‘cesarean section’ Category

Family Centered Cesarean Plan

Saturday, October 16th, 2010

Below is my version of a family centered cesarean plan – can be used for a planned or unplanned cesarean delivery.

Sample Cesarean Plan PDF

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We are trying to make a cesarean delivery as special and intimate as possible for us even though we did not have the desired vaginal birth.

DURING DELIVERY / RECOVERYIn the event a general anesthesia needs to be performed, I understand that some of my requests cannot be honored.

  • I would like to meet each staff member in the OR who will be participating in the cesarean.
  • I may use aromatherapy to help with nausea, surgical smells and stress.
  • I would like to play ______ music in the OR if it won’t be a distraction to those performing surgery.
  • Explain all medications that will be used to me. I prefer a bolus and oral medications versus a PCA afterward.
  • I would like for my husband (partner/family member) and baby to stay in the OR with me while surgery is completed and remain in recovery with me.
  • If the baby needs medical assistance requiring leaving the OR I’d like for another person (doula, friend or family member) to attend me in the OR while my husband (partner/family member) goes with the baby so I won’t have to be alone.
  • I would like to take photos and video of the birth of my baby.  I respect that the surgeon and anesthesiologist may not want the entire surgery on video, however I would like a record of my baby being born to make it as special and personal as possible.
  • Please lower the curtain and hold my baby up so I can see him/her at the moment of birth.
  • Request my arms not be strapped down so I may touch my baby freely.
  • I would like my baby to remain connected to the placenta after manual extraction, as the cord will continue to pulsate for some time. I would like my ___________ to cut the cord after 10 minutes post delivery or the cord has stopped pulsating near the umbilicus.
  • I would like my baby placed skin to skin on my chest immediately after basic assessments while in the OR. My husband (partner/family member can hold baby there with a warm blanket over my baby.
  • In the event of a hysterectomy, please do not remove my ovaries or anything else that isn’t medically necessary.
  • I would like to breastfeed my baby as soon as possible in recovery.

REGARDING BABY

  • In the event the baby requires medical attention beyond that of a healthy baby, please inform me (husband/partner/family member) verbally what is needed or will be needed so I can actively participate in choices made for my baby’s care.
  • Limit the number of persons who touch or attend my baby to only those on staff as needed and my husband (partner/family member).
  • Request my baby not be bathed or fully dressed until I have the opportunity to smell, touch, cuddle, etc. with my baby and I am able to participate in the bathing.
  • Delaying immunizations, even eye ointment and vitamin K.
  • I plan to breastfeed exclusively, so no pacifier, formula, sugar water should be given to my baby.
  • No tests shall be performed or medications administered, etc. without my (husband/partner/family member) consent & prior knowledge

Thank you for honoring my requests for me and my baby.

Tell NBC What YOU Think – ICAN meets mother-sized activisim

Sunday, February 7th, 2010

http://blog.ican-online.org/2010/02/07/mother-sized-activism-nbc/

The International Cesarean Awareness Network wants you to get involved and speak your mind about what you think of the NBC “Live in the OR” piece from last week. Here is the link to ICAN’s official response.

The only way that mass media will be responsible for what they put on the airwaves is for real people, the  consumers to speak their minds.  Please click on the above think and go for it. Be heard. It does make a difference.

“Elective” Cesarean – If you had one…..

Friday, February 5th, 2010

There is much in the news and in community talk how women are signing up for cesareans electively. I am very intrigued by this assumption and believe there is much misinformation regarding the topic out in the public for consumption. I am seeking to shed some more light on this topic.

Though this is not a scientific survey, I believe your experiences can help others in understanding why women are making this choice, as well as, potentially aiding other women in informed decision making.

If you have had or are planning an “elective” cesarean, I appreciate you answering this informal survey.  Answers can be submitted via confidential email to desirre@prepforbirth.com. By responding you are agreeing to allow me to use the information anonymously in a future blog, writing or other educational medium.

  1. Was your “elective cesarean for a medical reason?  If so, what?
  2. Was your “elective” cesarean for a non-medical reason?  If so, what?
  3. How were you given informed consent?
  4. What information were you given in the cesarean consent for benefits, risks, consequences, and alternative for you and your baby?
  5. Were any words such as: Easier, safer, painless, no big deal, not risky, saves vagina or less pain used to describe potential experience?
  6. Were you told your cesarean was necessary and found out later it was coded as elective?
  7. Did you ever feel pressured or led by care provider to choose cesarean?
  8. After your cesarean, did you feel you were consented fully enough prior to the surgery?
  9. Did the cesarean “do” or live up to what you were told for you and your baby?  How so?  How not?
  10. Would you make the same choice again or would you “go for” a VBAC?
  11. What country do you reside?

Thank you very much for answering these questions. I am so grateful for input on this subject.

If you would like any information shared and attributed to you as a quote,  please indicate in your email to me.  As stated above, otherwise your identity will be kept completely anonymous and confidential.

Sisterhood of the Scar Revisited

Sunday, January 3rd, 2010

Many years ago I wrote this piece after attending my very first ICAN conference in San Diego in 2005. I read this and part of me weeps for her, for the me I was and for the women who are becoming part of this sisterhood willingly, wittingly or not.  My pain has been transformed into outstretched hands and heart. It has given me a sensitivity and awareness of the birth world I would probably have never achieved on my own had my births been perfect, idyllic and without this trauma.

I love you dear sisters and my life would be far less without each of you.

Seems a long distance the ivory tower to the ground.  The surprise in finding the thorny bushes with burrs that dig deep and puncture again at will? Well meaning onlookers say “Well a hundred years ago you both would have died?”  And the farce begins.  Stuff it down because it is crazy not to be grateful for the surgeon’s hand.  Smile and pretend all the twisted darkness inside doesn’t really exist.  The oft daily chore mixed with joy of caring for a baby whom we are unsure is truly our own.   The continuing assault during lovemaking when a cringe comes from the depths when a loving and hungry hand brushes the incision site.  “How can he think I am beautiful?  How can he possibly want this?”  Another thing of beauty and perfection quashed underneath the burden of the surgeon’s handprint.  Oh no say it hasn’t already been a year.  The birthday.  THE birthday sounds so exciting but terror strikes.  Preparation to be happy, preparation to feel joy.  Preparation not to shortchange our amazing gift of a child under the pain of the surgeon’s knife print.

The anticipated day meant to birth us into motherhood and my child into my waiting hands to my craving breasts, I was birthed into the Sisterhood of the Scar forever.

How real is active phase arrest of labor?

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

Preparing For Birth: 35+ and Pregnant

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Hourglass

The disturbing trend in treating ALL  “advanced maternal age”  mothers (over 35 at the time of impending birth) high risk continues to grow despite lack of evidence to do so.

My original post from 3.5 years ago still rings true today.

They are being subject to weekly Biophysical profiles or Fetal Non-stress tests tests that are normally reserved only for high-risk mothers and babies from as early as 32 weeks in pregnancy.  On top of the scans, these mothers are often pressured to agree to an early delivery of their babies by means of labor induction or cesarean even without other risk associations.  This is growing more and more prevalent especially for women over 35 who are first time mothers.

I have heard even from women that at their first OB appointment they are being told they will be induced at 39 weeks as a standard of practice and expectation for signing on with said provider.  The seed of fear and worry is being planted that their growing baby will die if the pregnancy goes to 40 weeks or longer.  What a way to start out a provider/mother relationship.  I would call that a red flag of immense proportion.

So what really is the big deal with “old” mothers?  This study Advanced Maternal Age Morbidity and Mortality correlates various medical issues with “AMA” mothers though the biggest hot button is an elevated yet unknown cause of perinatal death.  This statement alone has caused a huge shift in the way these mothers are viewed regardless of  overall pregnancy health and absence of any known risk associations. ACOG’s February 2009  Managing Stillbirths maintains there is a risk to older mothers with no explanation as to why there is a risk, what the percentage of  risk increase is or any prevention protocols.  Seems dodgy since the other groups noted in the bulletin have all the data included.

There are some serious problems with any practitioner taking this study and applying it across the board to “AMA” women.  The study even says so much, “It is important to note that the findings of this study may not be generalized to every advanced-maternal-age obstetric patient in the United States. Although the FASTER trial patient population was unselected, meaning that patients were not excluded based on any confounding factors such as race, parity, BMI, education, marital status, smoking, pre-existing medical conditions, previous adverse pregnancy outcomes, and use of assisted reproductive care, there may have been significant patient or provider self-selection.” So the population could have been skewed from the get go by provider or patient selection, along with the fact that it seems the only point of homogeneity is present in that most of the women were Caucasian.  Throw all these women in a pot and see what happens?  Next step is to make protocols and change practice style upon weak findings?

The study also shows an increased risk for cesarean by “AMA” mothers.  “As with prior literature, this study demonstrated that women aged 40 years and older are at increased risk for cesarean delivery. Older women may be at increased risk for abnormalities of the course of labor, perhaps secondary to the physiology of aging. It is possible that decreased myometrial efficiency occurs with aging. Nonetheless, maternal age alone may be a factor influencing physician decision making. It is uncertain whether the increased rates of cesarean delivery are due to a real increase in the prevalence of obstetric complications or whether there is a component of iatrogenic intervention secondary to both physician and patient attitudes toward pregnancy in this older patient population.” Very interesting. So “old” women are perceived as being unable or problematic so they have less successful vaginal birth outcomes. Now that is a self-fulfilling practice style with a huge dose of ageism thrown in.  I also wonder what the cesarean rate in this age grouping is going to be due to these protocols.

Let’s get to the perinatal and neonatal death risks.  The study says: “Studies regarding an increased risk for perinatal mortality in women of advanced maternal age have been controversial. In this study, the increased risk of perinatal mortality was not statistically significant for patients aged 35–39 years (adjOR 1.1). Age 40 years and older was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of perinatal loss (adjOR 2.2). There were only 119 stillbirths and 37 neonatal demises in total. As a result, we could not draw any meaningful conclusions about the etiology or timing of perinatal mortality in women of advancing maternal age. The reason that advanced-maternal-age patients may be at increased risk of perinatal mortality is unknown. The failure of uterine vasculature to adapt to the increased hemodynamic demands of pregnancy as women age is a proposed explanation. So in conclusion, we have no idea why this might occur and have no way of counseling “AMA” mothers to lower the risk especially those over 40. Another noteworthy thought is that this study had 79% under 34 year old women, 17% 35-39 year old women, and only 4% women over aged 40.  So with such a small grouping ALL women considered “AMA” are being put under very heavy handed protocols to delivery their babies in the 39th week of gestation.

In closing, I find it difficult to believe that anyone who reads this study would change practice style because of it and move pregnant patients who are otherwise maintaining a healthy pregnancy without risk associations to a high risk model of care. Amazingly the study itself says the same thing, “In summary, the majority of women of advanced maternal age deliver at term without maternal or perinatal adverse outcomes.” And, “The role of routine antenatal surveillance in women aged 40 years and older requires further investigation because these women seem to be at increased risk for perinatal mortality, including stillbirth. Although the likelihood of adverse outcomes increases along with maternal age, patients and obstetric care providers can be reassured that overall maternal and fetal outcomes are favorable in this patient population.”

Couldn’t have said it better myself.

Since the original posting – – – instead of women being told they must be induced in the 39th week they are now being “offered” non-medical, cesareans as a first course of action.  This sort of pressure is not evidence-based or even medically ethical in my opinion.

Preparing For Birth – Common Pregnancy and Childbirth Terms

Tuesday, August 25th, 2009

Below is a compilation of common terms and acronyms that women often will come across during pregnancy, labor, and delivery.  Check back as more will be added from time to time.

  • AROM – Artificial Rupture of Membranes – using a finger or tool to open the amniotic sac to to allow the fluid to release.
  • PROM – Premature Rupture of Membranes – when the amniotic fluids releases before labor starts.
  • SROM – Spontaneous Rupture of Membranes during labor.
  • ROM – Rupture of Membranes
  • Miso – Misoprostol is the pharmacological name for Cytotec a drug used for cervical ripening and induction though a controversial, off and against label used ulcer Medication
  • VBAC – Vaginal Birth After Cesarean
  • HBAC – Home Birth After Cesarean
  • WBAC – Water Birth After Cesarean
  • UBAC – Unattended Birth After Cesarean
  • CBAC – Cesarean Birth After Cesarean – This is a repeat cesarean after a woman desires and tries to have a vaginal birth after cesarean.
  • ERCS – Elective Repeat Cesarean
  • RCS – Repeat Cesarean
  • Natural Birth – Labor and vaginal delivery free from intervention except for intermittent fetal monitoring. In the hospital only a saline lock and intermittent monitoring.
  • Vaginal Birth – Baby born vaginally with or without medication and intervention.
  • First Stage – Early, Active, and Transition. This encompasses the effacement to 100%, dilation to 10 centimeters/complete, position movement of cervix from posterior to forward as contractions begin while staying longer, strong and closer together prior to pushing and delivery.
  • Second Stage – Pushing phase after cervix is completely dilated to delivery of baby.
  • Third Stage – Delivery of baby to delivery of placenta.
  • Fourth Stage – First hours after placenta is delivered.
  • Oxytocin – A hormone made in the brain that plays a role in childbirth and lactation by causing muscles to contract in the uterus (womb) and the mammary glands in the breast. It also plays a role in bonding with mate, child, and socially.
  • Pitocin (oxytocin injection, USP) is a sterile, clear, colorless aqueous solution of synthetic oxytocin, for intravenous infusion or intramuscular injection.
  • Prostaglandin – Any of a group of hormone like fatty acids found throughout the body, esp. in semen, that affect blood pressure, metabolism, body temperature, and other important body processes such as cervical ripening.
  • Uterus -The muscular organ in which a fertilized egg implants and matures through pregnancy. During menstruation, the uterus sheds the inner lining.
  • Cervix -The lower portion of the uterus that provides an opening between the uterus and the vagina. Also known as the neck of the uterus that softens, effaces, dilates and changes position during labor.
  • Vagina – A muscular canal between the uterus and the outside of the body. Also known as the birth canal.
  • Perineum – The area between the anus and the vulva (the labial opening to the vagina).
  • Pelvis -The basin like cavity formed by the ring of bones of the pelvic girdle in the posterior part of the trunk in many vertebrates: in humans, it is formed by the ilium, ischium, pubis, coccyx, and sacrum, supporting the spinal column and resting upon the legs.
  • Pelvic Floor Muscles -The sphincter mechanism of the lower urinary tract, the upper and lower vaginal supports, and the internal and external anal sphincters. It is a network of muscles, ligaments, and other tissues that hold up the pelvic organs.  Includes bladder, rectum, vagina and uterus.
  • Fundus –  Top of the uterus. During labor contractions the fundus thickens and gets more firm as the strength of contractions increase and dilation increases.
  • Placenta -The organ that develops during pregnancy that transports nutrients to the fetus and waste away from the fetus. The placenta is attached to the uterus and is connected to the fetus by the umbilical cord.
  • Umbilical cord – The cord that transports blood, oxygen and nutrients to the baby from the placenta.
  • Bloody Show – Mucous and blood mixed together as dilation and effacement occurs.  Starts off as blood tinged mucous and becomes heavier as labor progresses.
  • Stripping membranes –  Pressing the amniotic sac away from the inside of the cervix.
  • Mucous plug – The mucous that blocks off the non-dilated and non-ripened cervix for protection.
  • Lochia – Post birth bleeding that though a wound site from the placenta detaching from the uterine wall, it mimics a heavy and long menstrual period.
  • Cesarean – Baby born via a surgical incision made through the abdomen into the uterus.
  • Obstetrician – Is the surgical specialty dealing with the care of women and their children during pregnancy, childbirth and the immediate post birth time.
  • Midwife – Is a person usually a woman who is trained to assist women during pregnancy,  during childbirth, and postpartum as well as the newborn post birth.  There are many types of midwives – some work in the home, at birth centers or in the hospital.
  • Doula – Is an assistant who provides various forms of non-medical and non-midwifery support (physical and emotional) in the childbirth process. Based on a particular doula’s training and background, the doula may offer support during prenatal care, during childbirth and/or during the postpartum period. A birth doula provides support during labor. A labor doula may attend a home birth or might attend the laboring at home and continue while in transport and then complete supporting the birth at a hospital or a birth center. A postpartum doula typically begins providing care in the home after the birth. Such care might include cooking for the mother, breastfeeding support, newborn care assistance, errands, light housekeeping, etc. Such care is provided from the day after the birth, providing services through the first six weeks postpartum. In some cases, doula care can last several months or even to a year postpartum – especially in cases when mothers are suffering from postpartum depression, children with special needs require longer care, or there are multiple infants.
  • Birth Center – Free standing location usually run by one or more certified nurse midwife. True birth centers are almost always independently run. They are not overseen by a hospital or in a hospital. May be near a hospital. Often set-up like a home birth space and epidurals or other pain medications are not available.   Hospital “birth centers” are labor and delivery floors not birth centers in the true sense of the term.
  • Intervention – Anything that does not exist in a naturally occuring labor and delivery that is done.
  • Saline Lock/Buffalo Cap/ Hep Lock – Is the apparatus that the IV line hooks into.  It is silicone tubing that is lightweight with a plastic needle that stays under the skin to allow easy vein access.
  • Foley – A foley catheter is used to release the bladder if a woman unable to urinate due to an epidural, post surgery, or with a swollen urethra post birth.  It can also be used for successful cervical ripening in lieu of cytotec.
  • Induction – To attempt to artificially start labor usually by pitocin, artificial rupture of membranes with or without cervical ripening (Cytotec or Foley Catheter).
  • Epidural – A medical method of giving pain relief during labor. A catheter is inserted through the lower back into a space near the spinal cord. Anesthesia is given through this catheter, and results in decreased sensation from the abdomen to the feet.
  • Contraction – Tightening and loosening of your uterus. Productive contractions are often felt at the bottom of the uterus, start out like period cramps and progressively grow stronger, longer in length, and closer together.
  • Braxton-Hicks – Practice contractions that do not dilate or efface the cervix often felt at the top of the uterus versus the bottom.
  • Episiotomy – A surgical procedure to widen the outlet of the birth canal to facilitate delivery of the baby and avoid a jagged rip of the perineum. (Natural abrading or tearing is preferred and episiotomies are not evidence-based to be used except under specific circumstances).
  • Ina May’s Sphincter Law -Tapping into the concept that if one sphincter is open and relaxed, the others will also open, relax and be able to handle, quite adequately, the task at hand. This also includes the aspect of birth requiring privacy, sacredness, and honor as well so a woman feels safe, unwatched and supported.
  • Kegel Exercises – Named after Dr. Arnold Kegel, consists of contracting and relaxing the muscles that form part of the pelvic floor (sometimes called the “Kegel muscles”).

Radio Interview on Whole Mother show – Cesareans, VBAC & Prevention

Wednesday, August 5th, 2009

Here is the radio interview I did with Debbie Hull of the Whole Mother Radio show.  We talked about the current percentage of cesareans, VBAC availability, where to obtain support, ways to prevent an unnecessary cesarean and much more!

http://archive.kpft.org/mp3/090803_063001wholemother.MP3

What might a cesarean get you? Often more than is bargained for.

Tuesday, July 28th, 2009

This is a  slight re-do from a popular blog post from early 2008. The information is vital and pertinent to the near 1.5 million women (based on previous CDC data) who will have a cesarean surgery this year.

Having a cesarean section will almost always  get you a baby.  Generally there is much more to it and anyone could bargain for or anticipate even in the best of recoveries.

Let me count the ways in no particular order:

  • A scar that in no way makes a bikini look better. Sometimes described as a shelf or a pouch.
  • The feeling of failure, guilt or less than deserving of motherhood.
  • The struggle of living with the huge dichotomy of loving your baby and perhaps hating the birth.
  • Higher probability of losing your ability to have more children either through physiologic secondary infertility, pregnancy complications, self-induced secondary infertility, hysterectomy or lack of sexual intimacy in relationship.
  • Higher probability of difficulty in breastfeeding.
  • Postpartum depression or PTSD, especially in an unwanted cesarean.
  • The feeling of failure as a wife or partner.
  • Having others discount your feelings and needs. After all you “just” had a baby. Really you just had MAJOR surgery, perhaps by coercion, a true medical indication, or completely from interventions and medications.
  • Living with the idea that you failed to pass induction, you failed to push out your baby, you failed because _________ (fill in the blank).
  • Obtaining your records to find what you were told and what was written are different. Could your trusted care provider have lied and cheated you?
  • Simply finding out that no one told you and you didn’t think it would happen to you. That being induced, getting the epidural, allowing AROM, not getting out of bed, etc. is why you had the cesarean. Is maternal ignorance and fear enough to quell what you feel and make it okay?
  • How can you trust yourself as a mother when you ignored your maternal intuition and kept saying yes, because the nurse, midwife or doctor told you to?
  • The way your marriage or partnership takes a turn toward hell or in the least a divided place.
  • Living with dread when a hungry hand sweeps over your scar. Being sexual can be extremely difficult physically and emotionally.
  • Having great fear of becoming pregnant again.
  • Having great fear of going for a VBAC and ending up in the OR at the end.
  • Not being understood and having others say to your face how lucky you are that you got to take the easy way out.
  • Pain.
  • Difficulty moving, walking, getting up, rolling over, coughing, laughing, tending to personal cleaning…. You get the idea. It is surgery.

Though not every woman will experience what is on the list, many do.  For all of these – there a stories layered and interwoven for too many women.

Every thirty seconds a woman is surgically having her baby delivered. Light her a candle. Offer her a meal. Let her speak. Listen to her intently. Don’t judge her. Send her to ICAN. http://www.ican-online.org/.

Preparing for Post Birth –

Saturday, July 25th, 2009

Putting effort into the initial postpartum period is in my opinion equally as important as preparing for pregnancy and birth.  Sometimes it is even more important due to circumstance or birth outcome.  Too many focus solely on the labor, delivery and perhaps the “stuff” that goes with having a baby while completely forgetting to look at all incredible change that occurs with having a new baby 24 hours a day, 7 days per week.

Below is a listing of important information to think about, investigate, understand and/or plan for.  Make a note of people in your immediate life that can be a resource as you go through the list.

Look carefully at class descriptions you may take in your local area, some are very thorough and others do not go into information you need in detail.

Here’s to postpartum preparedness!

Common Physical Changes for the Mother

Uterine Change and Bleeding

Breast Expectations and Breastfeeding Norms

Hormones and Symptoms

Recovery Requiring Attention

Vaginal Tearing, Episiotomy, Cesarean, Extreme Soreness or Swelling, Hemorrhoids

Nutrition

Common Psychological Changes

Mother and Father/Partner Changes

Processing the Birth Experience

Processing Becoming a Family

Postpartum Mood Disorders

Peer and Professional Support Resources

Understanding Your New Baby

Babymoon

How Baby’s Feed

Attachment

Infant Development

New Family Dynamic

Coping with Sleep Deprivation and Exhaustion

Managing Stress

Grieving the Changes

Siblings and Pets

Knowing How to Get the Right Support

Postpartum Doulas and Practical Support

Making Your Best Decisions

Defining Parental Roles – Financial, Baby Care, Changing the Status Quo

Choosing a Health Care Provider for your Baby

Early Infant Health Care Decisions – Vaccinations, Circumcision, etc.

Parenting Philosophies

Developing Your Parenting Style

Where Baby Will Sleep

Boundaries with Family and Friends

When to Seek Professional Help

Relationship Care

Realistic Expectations

Sexual Intimacy

Practicalities of Life

“Dating”

Priorities

Single Parenting

Arranging Practical Support

Making a Community

Parenting Needs

Unexpected Outcomes

Processing a Difficult Birth

Babies with Medical Needs, Coping and Advocating

Dealing with Loss, Grief, and Trauma

I offer a Postpartum Strategies class privately in the Colorado Springs area that goes into more detail on many of these topics.  My Bookstore lists several helpful books as well.