Posts Tagged ‘c-section-delivery’

What might a cesarean get you? Often more than is bargained for.

Tuesday, July 28th, 2009

This is a  slight re-do from a popular blog post from early 2008. The information is vital and pertinent to the near 1.5 million women (based on previous CDC data) who will have a cesarean surgery this year.

Having a cesarean section will almost always  get you a baby.  Generally there is much more to it and anyone could bargain for or anticipate even in the best of recoveries.

Let me count the ways in no particular order:

  • A scar that in no way makes a bikini look better. Sometimes described as a shelf or a pouch.
  • The feeling of failure, guilt or less than deserving of motherhood.
  • The struggle of living with the huge dichotomy of loving your baby and perhaps hating the birth.
  • Higher probability of losing your ability to have more children either through physiologic secondary infertility, pregnancy complications, self-induced secondary infertility, hysterectomy or lack of sexual intimacy in relationship.
  • Higher probability of difficulty in breastfeeding.
  • Postpartum depression or PTSD, especially in an unwanted cesarean.
  • The feeling of failure as a wife or partner.
  • Having others discount your feelings and needs. After all you “just” had a baby. Really you just had MAJOR surgery, perhaps by coercion, a true medical indication, or completely from interventions and medications.
  • Living with the idea that you failed to pass induction, you failed to push out your baby, you failed because _________ (fill in the blank).
  • Obtaining your records to find what you were told and what was written are different. Could your trusted care provider have lied and cheated you?
  • Simply finding out that no one told you and you didn’t think it would happen to you. That being induced, getting the epidural, allowing AROM, not getting out of bed, etc. is why you had the cesarean. Is maternal ignorance and fear enough to quell what you feel and make it okay?
  • How can you trust yourself as a mother when you ignored your maternal intuition and kept saying yes, because the nurse, midwife or doctor told you to?
  • The way your marriage or partnership takes a turn toward hell or in the least a divided place.
  • Living with dread when a hungry hand sweeps over your scar. Being sexual can be extremely difficult physically and emotionally.
  • Having great fear of becoming pregnant again.
  • Having great fear of going for a VBAC and ending up in the OR at the end.
  • Not being understood and having others say to your face how lucky you are that you got to take the easy way out.
  • Pain.
  • Difficulty moving, walking, getting up, rolling over, coughing, laughing, tending to personal cleaning…. You get the idea. It is surgery.

Though not every woman will experience what is on the list, many do.  For all of these – there a stories layered and interwoven for too many women.

Every thirty seconds a woman is surgically having her baby delivered. Light her a candle. Offer her a meal. Let her speak. Listen to her intently. Don’t judge her. Send her to ICAN. http://www.ican-online.org/.

Cesarean vs. VBAC: A dramatic Difference

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

I have been invited to share with you an intimate and challenging (and graphic) journey of a mother from an unexpected primary cesarean, physician decided repeat cesarean and a home water birth after those two cesareans.

Before you watch it, take a deep breath and have an open mind. A box of tissues may be in order as well.

Cesarean vs. VBAC: A Dramatic Difference from Alexandra Orchard on Vimeo.

Watch how a baby is delivered in a cesarean birth and see the dramatic difference of what both the mother and baby experience in a home water birth after cesarean.


Thank you Alex for allowing me to share your story!  Many blessings to you and yours.

For more information on cesarean recovery, support, prevention and VBAC information go to www.ican-online.org.

Childbirth in the hospital – Navigational Tips

Thursday, April 3rd, 2008

There are many reasons why a woman chooses to birth in the hospital. Women have the right to choose where and with whom she will birth regardless of what another would choose.

Women need the tools to navigate the hospital setting. She and her baby ARE unique. They are human beings. Laboring women are often placed under one-size-fits-all standing orders and protocols. Because of this, pregnant women need to be very careful regarding the books read, the types of birthing shows viewed, the care provider chosen and the childbirth class taken prior to entering the hospital to birth.

Here are some tips for a truly healthier and safer experience:

  • Take the hospital tour – ask lots of questions – induction rate, induction medications and/or procedures routinely used, average cesarean rate for first time moms, VBAC rate, pitocin use rate, epidural rate, use of non-medical pain relief, natural childbirth rate, IV use versus saline lock, percentage of moms who utilize doulas, is pain management highly suggested to every laboring mom, monitoring norms, availability of tub or shower for labor, standard protocol on eating and drinking in labor, use of non-supine pushing positions, mobility in labor, are the labor and delivery nurses open to anything goes in labor, what is protocol on immediate postpartum baby care, is there a lactation staff available….
  • Read the pre-admit paperwork. If you are not sure what it says, ask a paralegal or lawyer to look at it. Be certain that you agree with what you are signing.
  • Do not sign epidural or cesarean consent form at pre-registration. You want to be fully consented during true decision making time. Be sure though to be familiar with benefits, risks and consequences of everything ahead of time.
  • Take a non-hospital childbirth class or independently run class within the hospital.
  • Only agree to induction for a true medical reason – (suspected big baby, pre-pre-eclampsia, being tired of pregnancy, care provider going on vacation, relative will be in town, being past your “due date”, just because you can – are not medical reasons)
  • When induction is necessary – choose a foley catheter to ripen the cervix over misoprostol (cytotec, miso, or the little pill) and if labor establishes upon cervical ripening – decline pitocin or ask to keep it very low over a longer period of time.
    Keep your “water” (amniotic sac) intact until it breaks on its own. This can keep infection probability much lower, lessen risk of cord prolapse, and lessen the discomfort of contractions among many other things.
  • As long as a mom and baby are low-risk – wait until well into active labor to arrive at the hospital – contractions 3 minutes apart and lasting a minute or more. Shortening the time in the labor and delivery room usually keeps interventions and medications to a minimum.
    Any birth and immediate postpartum preferences need to be discussed PRIOR to labor with your care provider. A concise birth preference plan can be given to the nurse upon arrival.
  • In the event a cesarean is necessary (hopefully not created by interventions and medications in labor), discuss with your care provider prior to labor what you would like to have occur (partner in OR, no separation of baby from mom, pictures taken, etc. – for a complete list, please email me).
  • Make postpartum baby care decisions prior to arriving at the hospital. You do not need to have a pediatrician or family practitioner picked out ahead, as the floor doctor will oversee your baby’s care. If you are unsure of what you want, it is always acceptable to delay any immunization, vitamin K injection, eye ointment, etc. until you have the opportunity to investigate further. As a parent you have the right to say yes or no to anything.

    The key thing to remember is that as a consumer, you are paying your care provider for a service, for the hospital staff to attend you respectfully, and for the use of the room you are renting. You do have rights. Protocols and practices are not laws. You can say yes or no to anything or everything.

    As a woman you are making parenting decisions throughout labor, delivery and early postpartum that should be respected, honored and can have lasting consequences. There is no do-over.

    Remember to be a driver – not a passenger!